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Small Faces - Small Faces [Decca] mp3 download

Small Faces - Small Faces [Decca] mp3 download

Performer: Small Faces
Title: Small Faces [Decca]
Style: British Invasion,Mod,Rock & Roll
Duration: 46:35
Released: 1966
Size MP3 version: 1464 mb
Size FLAC version: 1323 mb
Size WMA version: 1296 mb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 140
Format: MIDI AHX FLAC AUD RA APE
Genre: Pop Rock

Small Faces - Small Faces [Decca] mp3 download


Small Faces were an English rock band from East London. The group was founded in 1965 by members Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones, and Jimmy Winston, although by 1966 Winston was replaced by Ian McLagan as the band's keyboardist. The band is remembered as one of the most acclaimed and influential mod groups of the 1960s

Small Faces is the eponymous second studio album by the Small Faces, released in 1967. The album was their first for Immediate Records after leaving Decca. It peaked at number 12 in the UK Album Chart. The band's debut album, released on Decca in 1966, is also entitled Small Faces.

Just when the first-generation British Invasion bands galloped ahead into pop art in 1966, the Small Faces worked a heavy R&B groove on their 1966 debut. That's not to say that this pack of four sharp-suited mods were unaware of the times. If anything, no other British band of the mid-'60s was so keenly tuned into fashion, the four Small Faces capturing the style and sound of dancing pilled-up mods better even than the Who, possibly because the group could carry a groove better than the Who, as this tightly propulsive debut amply illustrates. Like many '60s debuts, The Small.

Small Faces were an English rock band from East London. The band is remembered as one of the most acclaimed and influential mod groups of the 1960s with memorable hit songs such as "Itchycoo Park", "Lazy Sunday", "All or Nothing", and "Tin Soldier", as well as their concept album Ogdens' Nut Gone Flake.

Small Faces is the debut album of the Small Faces, released in May 1966 by Decca Records. It includes the hit singles "Whatcha Gonna Do About It" and "Sha-La-La-La-Lee". The album was well received by music critics and was popular with the public, rising to number 3 on the UK album chart remaining at the top for several weeks. The album was recorded at IBC Studios, Portland Place, London between June 1965 and February 1966. Glyn Johns was the studio engineer

Red label Includes a voucher to download mp3 version of this album. Matrix, Runout (A-side runout): 4715372 BF85688-01 A1. Matrix, Runout (B-side runout): 4715372 BF85688-01 B1. Rights Society: BIEM, SDRM.

Small Faces (Decca Album) is a English album released on Oct 2011. Small Faces (Decca Album) Album has 12 songs sung by Small Faces. Listen to all songs in high quality & download Small Faces (Decca Album) songs on Gaana. attr("src", $('. de tp.

Small Faces were an English rock and roll band from London.

Small Faces were an influential British mod/psychedelic band of the 1960s, led by Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane with Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan (who replaced original organist Jimmy Winston). The Small Faces were all genuine East End mods. Small Faces were an influential British mod/psychedelic band of the 1960s, led by Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane with Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan (who replaced original organist Jimmy Winston). The Small Faces were all genuine East End mods

Small Faces is the debut album of the Small Faces, released in May 1966 by Decca Records. It includes the hit singles "Whatcha Gonna Do About It" and "Sha-La-La-La-Lee" Small Faces. Studio album by. Small Faces. 15 of this CD's 16 tracks were in mono, the exception being a stereo mix of "Sha La La La Lee".

Track List

Title/Composer Performer Time
1 Shake Sam Cooke Small Faces 2:55
2 Come on Children Kevin Jones / Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott / Jimmy Winston Small Faces 4:20
3 You'd Better Believe It Kenny Lynch / Jerry Ragovoy Small Faces 2:19
4 It's Too Late Kevin Jones / Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott / Jimmy Winston Small Faces 2:37
5 One Night Stand Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott Small Faces 1:50
6 What'cha Gonna Do About It Brian Potter / Ian Samwell Small Faces 1:59
7 Sorry She's Mine Kenny Lynch Small Faces 2:48
8 Own Up Time Kevin Jones / Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott / Ian McLagan Small Faces 1:47
9 You Need Loving Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott Small Faces 3:59
10 Don't Stop What You're Doing Kenney Jones / Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott / Ian McLagan Small Faces 1:55
11 E Too D Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott Small Faces 3:02
12 Sha-La-La-La-Lee Kenny Lynch / Mort Shuman Small Faces 2:56
13 Shake Sam Cooke Small Faces 2:51
14 Come on Children Kevin Jones / Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott / Jimmy Winston Small Faces 3:24
15 What'cha Gonna Do About It Brian Potter / Ian Samwell Small Faces 2:17
16 Own Up Time Kevin Jones / Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott / Ian McLagan Small Faces 2:25
17 E Too D Ronnie Lane / Steve Marriott Small Faces 3:11

Credits

Sam Cooke - Composer
Bruce Eder - Liner Notes
Kenney Jones - Composer, Drums
Kevin Jones - Composer
Ronnie Lane - Bass, Composer, Guitar (Bass), Producer, Vocals
Kenny Lynch - Composer
Steve Marriott - Composer, Guitar, Producer, Vocals
Ian McLagan - Composer, Guitar, Organ, Vocals
Brian Potter - Composer
Jerry Ragovoy - Composer
Ian Samwell - Composer
Mort Shuman - Composer
Small Faces - Primary Artist
Jimmy Winston - Composer, Organ
Frlas
This is the actual debut album by the Small Faces, which didn't see a proper US release until many years later. By the time they released an album in the US that finally got noticed, the band had moved past this phase and into soulful whimsical psychedelic pop. This album is a far cry from that sound.Small Faces were the chief rivals to The Who as Britain's premiere mod band. And while The Who had co-opted some R&B into their repertoire in their early days to capture some of the mod audience, it wasn't long before they ventured into power pop and harder rock in order to open up their revolutionary sonic attack. Small Faces, however, had a more soulful base to their music. Sure, it was rock, and they could rock out with the best of them, but the sound was much closer to what the mod scene was about at the time: a heavier reliance on R&B in addition to the snappy clothes they wore. There have even been some arguments back and forth about which band was better: listen to this album and the My Generation album back-to-back, as the two albums were released about four months apart, and formulate your own opinion. Whichever you choose, you won't be wrong.At the same time, however, Small Faces shouldn't be confused with the more popular Faces, led by Rod Stewart. Sure, the two bands share three key personnel (Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan and Kenney Jones), but whereas the Faces were a much looser and ramshackle sounding outfit, Small Faces had a much tighter musical attack.A great example of the Small Faces's soul-as-rock attack is their opener, Sam Cooke's "Shake", complete with emotive vocals, crunchy guitar, and a drum attack that sounds like what Keith Moon would've done on a good night. The band could also put out a good groove jam with tracks like "Come On Children" and "You Need Loving" (with lyrics that predates Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" by over three years). Easily the best track is the menacing "E Too D" (named after the chord sequence that drives the song). And you'll hear shots of feedback and guitar crackle on "Sha-La-La-La-Lee" and "What'cha Gonna Do About It"; both songs were hits in the UK. Even the lesser cuts on the album keep the energy and the intensity at a high level throughout.Small Faces were one of the best British Invasion-era bands to never make it in the US. If all you know of them is the trippy "Itchycoo Park" then you're in for quite a surprise here. This is the one album that deserved a chance in America at the time of release but never got one, even if pop and rock at the time was starting to move in an artier direction. The band's fortunes might've been vastly different. For fans of British Invasion rock, I highly highly recommend this album.